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Featured Articles from the Central Kentucky News

News | May 3, 2013
A “foreign body” is the term we use to describe anything other than food that your pet may have swallowed. It can be very complicated to determine whether a particular foreign body will make your pet sick. The most difficult cases of foreign body ingestion occur whenever the pet owner doesn't know that their pet swallowed something. Also, many foreign bodies that pets swallow are not dense enough to show up on an X-ray. However, the statistics about pets swallowing foreign objects may shock you. About 95 percent of all foreign objects swallowed by pets will pass without causing any problems.
NEWS
By Jonathan Kleppinger and jkleppinger@jessaminejournal.com | December 1, 2010
Jerry Allender drives a lot of places. He routinely leaves his Wilmore home to come to Nicholasville; he makes an annual 100-mile trip north; and this year, he drove to the reenactment of the Battle of Perryville. But Allender doesn’t sit behind the wheel of a car; he holds the reins as he sits in the carriage being pulled by his horse. The horse and carriage started as a hobby and turned into a business for Allender, and now he hopes to have others join him next year for a scenic trip back to Perryville.
NEWS
By Kendall Sparks/Photo by James Mann | September 6, 2013
A North Carolina museum curator is working as a sleuth on a cold case almost as old as Clark County. Sally Gant, of the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, N.C., is trying to solve a mystery involving an enigmatic artist who painted portraits of some of the area's early settlers. Her investigation brought her to Clark County recently. “I'm excited to be coming here,” Gant said. “I've been wanting to come to Clark County since I started this project.
NEWS
STEPHANIE SCHELL | July 12, 2007
STANFORD - After two years as Lincoln County's district fire chief, Roger Pullum resigned for the one thing that is more important than the department he's worked with for nearly 10 years. His baby girl, Katelyn, who's 4 months old, has Trisomy 18, also known as Edward's syndrome. It is similar to Down syndrome with respect to how chromosomes are affected. However, Trisomy 18 has three of the 18th chromosome and is usually fatal. It occurs in about one out of every 3,000 to 5,000 births.
NEWS
By LARRY VAUGHT and larry@amnews.com | August 24, 2010
LEXINGTON — He played for a Tennessee high school powerhouse — Alcoa — and grew up within minutes of the University of Tennessee campus. Yet Randall Cobb says it was his parents, not a coach or player, who had the biggest influence on what has already been a highly successful football career. “It was probably my dad who had the biggest influence,” said Cobb, UK’s versatile junior who is a preseason all-Southeastern Conference selection. “He has always been there supporting me, but he has also pushed me to be better than what I was. “I wouldn’t be nowhere near where I am at now if it was not for him and the things he did for me and the sacrifices he made to get my family where we are today.
NEWS
January 5, 2004
JUNCTION CITY - Bryon Casey Bowling, 23, of Junction City, was reported missing Sunday, according to the Kentucky State Police post at Richmond. As of this morning, he had been missing for a week, a post dispatcher said. Bowling is 5 feet 10 inches tall, weighs 155 pounds and has blond hair and blue eyes and scars on his left kneecap and left elbow. He has a medical condition that requires medication; he had medication with him at the time of his disappearance a week ago. He was last seen in Junction City on Dec. 29. He was in a white 1997 Chevrolet pickup truck with Kentucky plate 4230 MD and was wearing green work pants, navy blue sweat pants and gray and blue Nike tennis shoes.
NEWS
By Rachel Gilliam | December 21, 2012
For the Martin family, life really is a circus. Four kids, professional music careers and a family group with a growing number of performances can be a bit chaotic. Parents Paul and Jamie had that chaos in mind when they named their fledgling band The Martin Family Circus in 2010. “Jamie had decided to come, she was working a corporate job, and I was on the road with Marty Stuart. Our lives were nuts,” Paul Martin said. Winchester native Paul Martin has been performing with country musician Marty Stuart for years, and plays bass for “The Marty Stuart Show.” Previously, he has performed with the Oak Ridge Boys and Exile.
NEWS
By BOBBIE CURD and bcurd@amnews.com | September 24, 2010
LIBERTY — A Kentucky UFO-alien abduction case caught the eye of local playwright Liz Orndorff several years ago, but she tucked her idea for a production based on the claims of three Casey County women into the back of her mind to let it simmer. Although the incident happened more than 30 years ago, Mona Stafford — the only living witness — still hasn’t figured out how to tuck it into the back of hers. “High Strangeness” premiers tonight at West T. Hill Community Theatre in Danville, and a few folks who attended Thursday night’s dress rehearsal said the play is not only funny but quite moving.
NEWS
BOBBIE CURD | March 6, 2008
It's Wednesday and laughter leaks out into the hallway from a gathering room on the main floor of Heritage Hospice. Katelyn Pullum is turning 1, and this is something to celebrate. Doctors told Tammy Smith and Roger Pullum that Katelyn might have the disease Trisomy 18 after a blood test when Smith was only three months pregnant. The pregnancy was a surprise for Smith, a 44-year-old woman who was always told she would never conceive. But the delivery was even more surprising.
NEWS
By Mike Moore and mmoore@jessaminejournal.com | April 22, 2013
Citing low revenue streams and a need to beef up public-safety services, the Nicholasville City Commission passed an ordinance Monday that would allow Sunday alcohol sales starting July 1. Nicholasville finance director Laurie Young and utilities director Tom Calkins told the city commission that a 5-percent regulatory license fee on the sale of alcoholic beverages allowing Sunday alcohol sales would add $600,000 to $800,000 annually for the city's...
NEWS
TODD KLEFFMAN | March 22, 2006
Dr. Ronald C. Bibb Jr. pleaded guilty today to attempted unlawful transaction with a minor for soliciting sex from a 16-year-old girl during an office visit last year. A second charge against Bibb of third-degree sexual abuse was dismissed as part of a plea deal reached with prosecutors this morning before a scheduled preliminary hearing. Boyle District Judge Jeff Dotson sentenced Bibb to six months in jail probated for two years provided the doctor stays out of trouble. Bibb also has to write a letter of apology to the victim, perform 200 hours of community service and complete any treatment programs recommended by the state Board of Medical Licensure, which has already suspended Bibb from practicing medicine for two years.
NEWS
Journal Columnist | June 28, 2011
There is renewed talk about Obamacare lately, and whether or not to repeal it will be a central issue in the 2012 presidential election. The problem with Obamacare is that it doesn’t actually address the central issue — the cost. In fact, it increases the cost. Now that the American people have had time to digest what’s in the multi-thousand page bill that no one read before passing, we’re finding out how terrible a piece of legislation it is.  With that in mind, I thought I would share with you my five-point plan for reforming the health care system using free-market solutions: • Return more of each individual’s earned proceeds to their pockets.
NEWS
By Keith Taylor and The Winchester Sun | October 1, 2011
LEXINGTON - Every day, Andrew Rogers has to remind himself he's not dreaming when he awakes. “Sometimes I sit back and think, 'Am I really here or really there?'” he said. “It's just so much fun.” The George Rogers Clark graduate serves as a manager for former University of Kentucky standout and Sacramento Kings standout DeMarcus Cousins and making sure his schedule is intact and performing other pertinent duties. Rogers and Cousins have been close for more than two years, and one is hardly spotted in public without the other.
NEWS
By TODD KLEFFMAN and tkleffman@amnews.com | March 23, 2013
SOUTH FORK - Paul Martin is a small, wiry man with a higher-pitched voice, sharp features and kind nature that lends him an air of a wizened old elf. Beneath a broad-brimmed black hat, he is dressed in all black, sharp as tack, even though he has just pedaled three miles on his bicycle from Cedar Hill Mennonite Church, where some visiting Mennonite brethren from Iowa had just held forth. Martin is back at Dutchman's Market now. It's the store he and his late wife Ruth opened in 1982, one the first businesses to set up shop in the start-up Mennonite community in southern Casey County.
NEWS
BOBBIE CURD | October 7, 2006
A local "digger" is asked the best way to tell the difference between a real Civil War relic and a fake one. Mark Kitchen answers, "Darrell Young. He's the man to ask. He's kind of a legend to all us guys who started this a little later in life. " Kitchen is no freshman at dirt fishing, either. He's brought home valuable relics from his expeditions, like a cannon ball that had to be disarmed by removing the explosive powder, and a fully intact Union belt buckle, but he says Young is the go-to guy for anyone who "wants to know more.
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