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Featured Articles from the Central Kentucky News

News | By Jonathan Kleppinger and jkleppinger@jessaminejournal.com | December 1, 2010
Jerry Allender drives a lot of places. He routinely leaves his Wilmore home to come to Nicholasville; he makes an annual 100-mile trip north; and this year, he drove to the reenactment of the Battle of Perryville. But Allender doesn’t sit behind the wheel of a car; he holds the reins as he sits in the carriage being pulled by his horse. The horse and carriage started as a hobby and turned into a business for Allender, and now he hopes to have others join him next year for a scenic trip back to Perryville.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
A “foreign body” is the term we use to describe anything other than food that your pet may have swallowed. It can be very complicated to determine whether a particular foreign body will make your pet sick. The most difficult cases of foreign body ingestion occur whenever the pet owner doesn't know that their pet swallowed something. Also, many foreign bodies that pets swallow are not dense enough to show up on an X-ray. However, the statistics about pets swallowing foreign objects may shock you. About 95 percent of all foreign objects swallowed by pets will pass without causing any problems.
NEWS
TODD KLEFFMAN | January 14, 2009
LEXINGTON - A Harrodsburg couple have filed a federal lawsuit alleging Boyle County's top officials conspired with a farm manager to keep them from taking care of their horses, causing their business to lose money and animals to starve. James and Sandra Lattanzio, who list their address as a post office box in Harrodsburg, filed the complaint without an attorney last week in U.S. District Court in Lexington. The lawsuit alleges that County Attorney Richard Campbell, Judge-Executive Harold McKinney, Sheriff LeeRoy Hardin and Animal Control Officer Dan Turcea all worked together with Thomas Ackerman and Mahogany Hill Farm to keep the Lattanzios from tending to their horses, which were boarded at the farm on Airport Road.
NEWS
By BOBBIE CURD and bcurd@amnews.com | September 24, 2010
LIBERTY — A Kentucky UFO-alien abduction case caught the eye of local playwright Liz Orndorff several years ago, but she tucked her idea for a production based on the claims of three Casey County women into the back of her mind to let it simmer. Although the incident happened more than 30 years ago, Mona Stafford — the only living witness — still hasn’t figured out how to tuck it into the back of hers. “High Strangeness” premiers tonight at West T. Hill Community Theatre in Danville, and a few folks who attended Thursday night’s dress rehearsal said the play is not only funny but quite moving.
NEWS
By Dr. Jeff Castle, DVM | April 1, 2011
Put simply, animals fight. No matter what species, at some point in time, for some reason, all animals will engage in fighting with their own species. Some fight for territory, dominance, food, protection of an owner, and many other reasons, depending on the particular animal. Dogs often fight one another with only the intention of warning or trying to scare the other. However, many dog fights are much more aggressive, with severe injury intended for each other. Just like many other medical conditions, such as diseases and parasites, dog fights tend to occur more in the spring and summer.
FEATURES
EMILY TOADVINE | July 5, 2009
I am a waver, but my displays of friendliness pale in comparison to those of Donald Pike. For a few seasons I have told my kids, "Get ready. We're almost at The Waver's house. " We all throw up a hand and he enthusiastically returns our waves. I know that some people only wave when they know someone, but Pike knows no strangers in the parade of life that cruises by his house on the Forkland side of Parksville Knob. He throws up a hand to everyone. See video in video player on home page of amnews.
NEWS
By LARRY VAUGHT and larry@amnews.com | August 11, 2012
He played in 124 games at Kentucky and shot a remarkable 59.3 percent from the field, the best mark ever at UK when his playing career ended in 1983. However, even though he scored 786 points, grabbed 496 rebounds and had 104 assists, Charles Hurt has never been back to a game in Rupp Arena since leaving Kentucky. "Kentucky basketball was a big part of my life, but that was years ago. I eventually hope to go back, but that is just the way it has worked out,” Hurt said. “You get a family, and that becomes a priority.
OBITUARY
June 30, 2007
ROBERT A. REYNOLDS Robert Allen Reynolds, 78, died at 6:37 a.m. Friday at his home at 119 Stratford Glenn Drive. He was a native of Rochester, N.H., and the son of the late Sumner Reynolds and Edna Elizabeth Littlefield Reynolds. He was the husband of Edna Maye Cooper Reynolds, and he was a retired United States Forest Service employee for the federal government. He served in the United States Army during the Korean Conflict and was a former sergeant in the Army. Survivors other than his wife are four daughters and sons-in-law, Katherine and her husband B.J. Wasson of Winchester, Terry and her husband Tom E. Norton also of Winchester, Sharon and her husband John Phillips of Cincinnati, Ohio, and Diana and her husband Robert Levin of Plantation, Fla. Funeral services will be 2 p.m Tuesday at the Rolan G. Taylor funeral home, 289 S. Main St. by Dr. Art Beasley and the Rev. Dennis Wainright.
NEWS
By TODD KLEFFMAN and tkleffman@amnews.com | March 23, 2013
SOUTH FORK - Paul Martin is a small, wiry man with a higher-pitched voice, sharp features and kind nature that lends him an air of a wizened old elf. Beneath a broad-brimmed black hat, he is dressed in all black, sharp as tack, even though he has just pedaled three miles on his bicycle from Cedar Hill Mennonite Church, where some visiting Mennonite brethren from Iowa had just held forth. Martin is back at Dutchman's Market now. It's the store he and his late wife Ruth opened in 1982, one the first businesses to set up shop in the start-up Mennonite community in southern Casey County.
NEWS
DAN GRIGSON | January 31, 2008
Farmers need to be in gear now to get their pasture and hay fields improved. Adding clover to our grass fields has a lot of economic benefits. I have producers tell me it is too expensive to sow clover. Well these folks forget to look past the purchase price. You need to look at the bottom line which is net returns for the dollars and labor you spend. Clover in your pasture increases the productivity to where cattle gain better, more pasture is available to take hay from and more cattle can be run per acre.
NEWS
EMILY BURTON | March 4, 2004
CRAB ORCHARD - This winter, as gardeners sipped hot chocolate and entertained green dreams of growing things, members of the Amish community cultivated a new produce auction pavilion for the fruits, and vegetables, of their labors. The Lincoln County Produce Auction is almost ripe for it's April 13 opening day. With Tuesday's delivery of rich black asphalt for the parking lot, the new pavilion is ready to flourish. "We hope to provide an additional income and market for Lincoln County farmers," said the general manager of the auction.
FEATURES
JOHN T. DAVIS | January 17, 2005
CRAB ORCHARD - A visitor to Mary and Mahlon Byler's Kountry Kitchen Store has to be persistent. Although visitors are directed to the store by a sign on Ky. 39 north of Crab Orchard, just at the point where motorists might be ready to give up on the narrow, winding road, a final sign directs them to the Bylers' neat, Amish homestead. "It is surprising how many people find us," said Mary Byler of the store the couple have operated at 902 Swamper Road for the past six years.
NEWS
November 9, 2011
The Kentucky Banker's Association calls it a “scheme” but unless - and until - legislators change the law, so called “third-party tax purchasers” will continue to profit from a policy that can lead to a forced sale of a family home. As the law stands, individuals, or companies formed for just this purpose, can purchase overdue property tax debt as an investment. The tax debt plus up to 12 percent interest as well as additional administrative and attorney fees increase the original debt substantially.
NEWS
July 2, 2006
BOYLE COUNTY DISTRICT COURT Cases handled recently in Boyle District Court, listed by name, charge, fine, and jail sentence, where applicable, include the following. Court costs also were assessed in most cases. Ages and addresses are listed if available. Nathan D. Sparks, 37, Gravel Switch, theft by deception less than $300, check diversion program; contempt of court, $50. Lisa Summers, 41, 142 Stanford Ave., theft by deception less than $300, check diversion program.
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