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Featured Articles from the Central Kentucky News

News | By Jonathan Kleppinger and jkleppinger@jessaminejournal.com | December 1, 2010
Jerry Allender drives a lot of places. He routinely leaves his Wilmore home to come to Nicholasville; he makes an annual 100-mile trip north; and this year, he drove to the reenactment of the Battle of Perryville. But Allender doesn’t sit behind the wheel of a car; he holds the reins as he sits in the carriage being pulled by his horse. The horse and carriage started as a hobby and turned into a business for Allender, and now he hopes to have others join him next year for a scenic trip back to Perryville.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
A “foreign body” is the term we use to describe anything other than food that your pet may have swallowed. It can be very complicated to determine whether a particular foreign body will make your pet sick. The most difficult cases of foreign body ingestion occur whenever the pet owner doesn't know that their pet swallowed something. Also, many foreign bodies that pets swallow are not dense enough to show up on an X-ray. However, the statistics about pets swallowing foreign objects may shock you. About 95 percent of all foreign objects swallowed by pets will pass without causing any problems.
NEWS
August 19, 2005
LANCASTER - A head-on collision in the early morning hours required three helicopters to airlift individuals to University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center. According to the Garrard County Ambulance Service, the wreck occurred on Ky. 34 in Garrard County after midnight. The helicopters transported three of the four people involved to the trauma center, while one individual was taken by ambulance. EMS Director Colby Arnold said that Camp Dick Rescue had to extricate all patients out of the two vehicles.
OPINION
By Brad Jones | September 2, 2009
Lemiel Stiddom stood in the soft grass on the banks of Cave Run Lake near Stoney Cove, remembering. "The old house sat here," he said, pointing to a small grassy area between the dam and the water, "and the church sat to the right," motioning toward the rocks and shallow water a few feet away. Stiddom, on a recent visit to Stoney Cove, recalled life in the area before the Licking River was flooded 40 years ago. Looking out over the water, he remembered some of the local landmarks that vanished when the lake was constructed, landmarks that were torn down, moved, or simply flooded by the large reservoir; neighbors' homes, farms, old cemeteries and the nearby church, Lewis Chapel, were some landmarks he named.
NEWS
By Jonathan Stark and jstark@jessaminejournal.com | April 4, 2012
While most high-school coaches are also teachers and earn the bulk of their pay in the classroom, they are also compensated for their time on and off the field developing their programs. It may just be a few extra bucks on each paycheck, but over the course of a school year, some teachers can increase their annual salaries by several thousand dollars. A teacher making $45,651 - the average salary paid in Jessamine County in the 2011-12 school year - could increase his or her pay 10 percent or more with any of the seven highest-paying head-coaching positions.
NEWS
By Mike Moore and mmoore@jessaminejournal.com | January 23, 2013
Slightly more than a year after Adcom Wire ceased operations in Nicholasville, a new company is poised to move into the facility located at 220 Stephens Drive. MetalForm and Fab, which has been located in Lexington off Old Frankfort Pike since it opened in 2005, will move its operations to Nicholasville, according to Chris Adkins, operations manager and co-owner. “We're tentatively looking at mid-March, (but) April 1 is the deadline,” Adkins said. “We've absolutely got to be there by then.” According to its website, MetalForm and Fab offers an “array of services from engineering and design, to complete assemblies.” “We're in metal fabrication,” Adkins said.
NEWS
By Jennifer Howard | June 1, 2011
Fewer fruits signify summer in Kentucky more than fresh blackberries. This wild fruit has been tamed through the years, but wild or tame, they are still satisfying The peak season for blackberries in Kentucky is June through July. A half cup serving of blackberries has only 35 calories, 7 grams of carbohydrates and 4 grams of fiber. They are also high in vitamin C and potassium. Blackberries and raspberries differ from other berries as they have fleshy segments. Blackberries are similar to raspberries, but they are larger, hardier and have a dark purple appearance.
NEWS
By Mike Moore and mmoore@jessaminejournal.com | April 22, 2013
Citing low revenue streams and a need to beef up public-safety services, the Nicholasville City Commission passed an ordinance Monday that would allow Sunday alcohol sales starting July 1. Nicholasville finance director Laurie Young and utilities director Tom Calkins told the city commission that a 5-percent regulatory license fee on the sale of alcoholic beverages allowing Sunday alcohol sales would add $600,000 to $800,000 annually for the city's...
NEWS
September 30, 2006
FRANKFORT (AP) - Kenny Bishop was living his dream, standing in front of adoring fans in auditoriums across the country, singing gospel songs with his family as part of one of the most popular groups in Christian music. That ended in 2001 when the group disbanded unexpectedly and without explanation. Five years later, Bishop is back on the southern gospel charts with an album that sheds light on his departure. All the songs are about grace, including one based on the biblical story of the prodigal son, a young man who left his family for a life of sinful fun that ended with him having lost everything and living with pigs.
NEWS
By BOBBIE CURD and bcurd@amnews.com | September 24, 2010
LIBERTY — A Kentucky UFO-alien abduction case caught the eye of local playwright Liz Orndorff several years ago, but she tucked her idea for a production based on the claims of three Casey County women into the back of her mind to let it simmer. Although the incident happened more than 30 years ago, Mona Stafford — the only living witness — still hasn’t figured out how to tuck it into the back of hers. “High Strangeness” premiers tonight at West T. Hill Community Theatre in Danville, and a few folks who attended Thursday night’s dress rehearsal said the play is not only funny but quite moving.
NEWS
By Regene' Collier, Clark County Home Health Agency | August 29, 2011
When an elderly loved one has a stroke, they commonly suffer from one or more permanent mental or physical disabilities. Things they once did with ease can become extremely difficult or even impossible. When a stroke patient returns home, he or she will often require a number of home modifications to help them regain as much of their independence as possible. Home health care professionals often help patients return to their homes, teaching them how to live independently. The professionals who provide care in the home include nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists and medical social workers.
NEWS
November 9, 2011
The Kentucky Banker's Association calls it a “scheme” but unless - and until - legislators change the law, so called “third-party tax purchasers” will continue to profit from a policy that can lead to a forced sale of a family home. As the law stands, individuals, or companies formed for just this purpose, can purchase overdue property tax debt as an investment. The tax debt plus up to 12 percent interest as well as additional administrative and attorney fees increase the original debt substantially.
NEWS
EMILY BURTON | March 4, 2004
CRAB ORCHARD - This winter, as gardeners sipped hot chocolate and entertained green dreams of growing things, members of the Amish community cultivated a new produce auction pavilion for the fruits, and vegetables, of their labors. The Lincoln County Produce Auction is almost ripe for it's April 13 opening day. With Tuesday's delivery of rich black asphalt for the parking lot, the new pavilion is ready to flourish. "We hope to provide an additional income and market for Lincoln County farmers," said the general manager of the auction.
NEWS
By TODD¿KLEFFMAN and tkleffman@amnews.com | November 5, 2011
In the middle of the night a little more than a year ago, Michael P. Durham woke up in his Moreland home, popped a couple of night-time pain relievers and tried to go back to sleep. A short time later, however, Durham “began experiencing abdominal pain, brownouts, blackouts and a general sense of lightheadedness.” Then he developed an ulcer that “produced pain and caused an enormous amount of blood loss”¿that eventually required transfusions to keep him alive. It wasn't the Equate brand Rapid Release PM¿Pills that made Durham sick; it was the cannister inserted in the bottle meant to keep the pills dry that Durham inadvertently swallowed along with the tablets in his mid-night state of mind.
NEWS
By HELEN PALMER | January 23, 2012
Last week, I discussed canine noses, their scenting ability and some of the symptoms a responsible dog owner should notice that might spell a problem. This week, let's think about eyes. I always cringe when I hear of a puppy born blind, and I am in awe when I meet (or even hear about) the brave families that elect to adopt such a pup. I also have to smile when these families assure me that “it isn't as difficult as it seems, since the pup doesn't know what sight is and therefore, it compensates.” But let's think about the normal dog that is born with sight but develops a problem.
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