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Featured Articles from the Central Kentucky News

News | By Jonathan Kleppinger and jkleppinger@jessaminejournal.com | December 1, 2010
Jerry Allender drives a lot of places. He routinely leaves his Wilmore home to come to Nicholasville; he makes an annual 100-mile trip north; and this year, he drove to the reenactment of the Battle of Perryville. But Allender doesn’t sit behind the wheel of a car; he holds the reins as he sits in the carriage being pulled by his horse. The horse and carriage started as a hobby and turned into a business for Allender, and now he hopes to have others join him next year for a scenic trip back to Perryville.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
A “foreign body” is the term we use to describe anything other than food that your pet may have swallowed. It can be very complicated to determine whether a particular foreign body will make your pet sick. The most difficult cases of foreign body ingestion occur whenever the pet owner doesn't know that their pet swallowed something. Also, many foreign bodies that pets swallow are not dense enough to show up on an X-ray. However, the statistics about pets swallowing foreign objects may shock you. About 95 percent of all foreign objects swallowed by pets will pass without causing any problems.
NEWS
By TODD¿KLEFFMAN and tkleffman@amnews.com | October 1, 2011
As a self-described alcoholic bully who likes to fight, Jared Thomas knows one when he sees one.  And Thomas saw one when William Northington entered the Substance Abuse Program at the Boyle County Detention Center. “He's big and aggressive. He's got scars on his face. I knew the other guys would be listening to him,” explained Thomas, director of the SAP. “I knew if we couldn't get him on our side, we'd have to take the power away from him.” Northington turned out to be a team player of the first order.
NEWS
By BOBBIE CURD and bcurd@amnews.com | September 24, 2010
LIBERTY — A Kentucky UFO-alien abduction case caught the eye of local playwright Liz Orndorff several years ago, but she tucked her idea for a production based on the claims of three Casey County women into the back of her mind to let it simmer. Although the incident happened more than 30 years ago, Mona Stafford — the only living witness — still hasn’t figured out how to tuck it into the back of hers. “High Strangeness” premiers tonight at West T. Hill Community Theatre in Danville, and a few folks who attended Thursday night’s dress rehearsal said the play is not only funny but quite moving.
NEWS
July 3, 2012
Danielle “Dani” Thomas, 27, passed away on Tuesday, June 26, 2012, at her home in Astoria, N.Y.  Born on Thursday, March 28, 1985, in Boyle County, Danielle was a daughter of Jamie Thomas Bright and the late Calvin D. Thomas. Danielle was most recently a senior financial analyst for the Weight Watchers Company. Before accepting the position at Weight Watchers, Danielle worked several years for the Walt Disney Co.in Florida. She attended Boyle County High School, where she was a member of the marching band for five years and was a section leader playing alto saxophone.
NEWS
By Jennifer Howard | June 1, 2011
Fewer fruits signify summer in Kentucky more than fresh blackberries. This wild fruit has been tamed through the years, but wild or tame, they are still satisfying The peak season for blackberries in Kentucky is June through July. A half cup serving of blackberries has only 35 calories, 7 grams of carbohydrates and 4 grams of fiber. They are also high in vitamin C and potassium. Blackberries and raspberries differ from other berries as they have fleshy segments. Blackberries are similar to raspberries, but they are larger, hardier and have a dark purple appearance.
NEWS
By Mike Moore and mmoore@jessaminejournal.com | April 22, 2013
Citing low revenue streams and a need to beef up public-safety services, the Nicholasville City Commission passed an ordinance Monday that would allow Sunday alcohol sales starting July 1. Nicholasville finance director Laurie Young and utilities director Tom Calkins told the city commission that a 5-percent regulatory license fee on the sale of alcoholic beverages allowing Sunday alcohol sales would add $600,000 to $800,000 annually for the city's...
NEWS
By Dr. Jeff Castle, DVM | August 28, 2010
An Elizabethan collar is known by many different names such as surgical collar, buster collar and an abbreviation called E-collar. There has never been a veterinary medical device to receive as much attention as the E-collar. It is the subject for countless jokes and comic strips. It really is an unnatural, cumbersome, funny looking contraption around the neck of a cat or dog. The E-collar is a cone-shaped hard plastic device placed around a patient’s neck to prevent the dog or cat from licking or chewing on their wound or surgical incision.
NEWS
TODD KLEFFMAN | January 14, 2009
LEXINGTON - A Harrodsburg couple have filed a federal lawsuit alleging Boyle County's top officials conspired with a farm manager to keep them from taking care of their horses, causing their business to lose money and animals to starve. James and Sandra Lattanzio, who list their address as a post office box in Harrodsburg, filed the complaint without an attorney last week in U.S. District Court in Lexington. The lawsuit alleges that County Attorney Richard Campbell, Judge-Executive Harold McKinney, Sheriff LeeRoy Hardin and Animal Control Officer Dan Turcea all worked together with Thomas Ackerman and Mahogany Hill Farm to keep the Lattanzios from tending to their horses, which were boarded at the farm on Airport Road.
NEWS
By Dr. Jeff Castle, DVM | April 1, 2011
Put simply, animals fight. No matter what species, at some point in time, for some reason, all animals will engage in fighting with their own species. Some fight for territory, dominance, food, protection of an owner, and many other reasons, depending on the particular animal. Dogs often fight one another with only the intention of warning or trying to scare the other. However, many dog fights are much more aggressive, with severe injury intended for each other. Just like many other medical conditions, such as diseases and parasites, dog fights tend to occur more in the spring and summer.
NEWS
By BRENDA S. EDWARDS and Contributing Writer | March 23, 2013
A Danville man who became a businessman when he was a 14-year-old took an interest in balloons and airplanes and established a reputation as a stunt-flier and aerialist in the days of aviation barnstormers. Thomas Longo built his own bi-plane in a Danville shed and appeared as a stunt flier in state fairs and circuses around the country. Longo began his career in 1905 when he opened an operation in Danville to make a new soft drink - Lon-Cola - and became more famous later as a pioneer in aviation.
NEWS
December 28, 2007
FORKLAND - The artist community is saddened by the death of Paul W. Overstreet, known as "Boyle County's premier wildlife artist" by his associates and friends. Overstreet, 75, died Christmas Day at his residence after a bout with cancer. He began drawing when he was a young boy growing up on the Fork, a section of Boyle County he said provided his inspiration for scenes from the woods. He continued the hobby until 1980, when he took his art more seriously, quit his job with the state, and devoted most of his time to drawing and painting woodland scenes featuring animals, birds, wildflowers, trees and streams.
NEWS
September 30, 2006
FRANKFORT (AP) - Kenny Bishop was living his dream, standing in front of adoring fans in auditoriums across the country, singing gospel songs with his family as part of one of the most popular groups in Christian music. That ended in 2001 when the group disbanded unexpectedly and without explanation. Five years later, Bishop is back on the southern gospel charts with an album that sheds light on his departure. All the songs are about grace, including one based on the biblical story of the prodigal son, a young man who left his family for a life of sinful fun that ended with him having lost everything and living with pigs.
NEWS
November 9, 2011
The Kentucky Banker's Association calls it a “scheme” but unless - and until - legislators change the law, so called “third-party tax purchasers” will continue to profit from a policy that can lead to a forced sale of a family home. As the law stands, individuals, or companies formed for just this purpose, can purchase overdue property tax debt as an investment. The tax debt plus up to 12 percent interest as well as additional administrative and attorney fees increase the original debt substantially.
NEWS
By Jim Waters | June 15, 2012
For Kentucky legislators, the gold rush isn't an historical phenomenon of sunny California's past. It's happening here and now in the Bluegrass State. That's largely because of House Bill 299, a little piece of legislation passed in 2005 that supersized our elected public servants' pensions. In fact, if the media attention and public outrage earned pension-increasing legislation in 1982 the label of “greed bill,” an appropriate name for the 2005 law might be the “golden greed bill.” But this gold won't be taken from previously untapped resources in the Golden State to benefit an entire nation.
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