Advertisement

Featured Articles from the Central Kentucky News

News | By Sean Dailey | June 10, 2010
Those who see abortion as an evil are often frustrated by those who attempt to justify abortion by vague arguments about “choice” or even more practical arguments about exceptions for rape or incest, or the health of the mother. But many of these same people lose their moral clarity when the subject is torture. Suddenly they are the ones bringing up exceptions and parsing definitions. There is so much confusion over this issue that in a recent TV interview, a prominent Catholic journalist let a former Bush Administration speechwriter, also a Catholic, grossly misrepresent Catholic teaching in a shameful apologia for torture.
NEWS
By Jonathan Kleppinger and jkleppinger@jessaminejournal.com | December 1, 2010
Jerry Allender drives a lot of places. He routinely leaves his Wilmore home to come to Nicholasville; he makes an annual 100-mile trip north; and this year, he drove to the reenactment of the Battle of Perryville. But Allender doesn’t sit behind the wheel of a car; he holds the reins as he sits in the carriage being pulled by his horse. The horse and carriage started as a hobby and turned into a business for Allender, and now he hopes to have others join him next year for a scenic trip back to Perryville.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
A “foreign body” is the term we use to describe anything other than food that your pet may have swallowed. It can be very complicated to determine whether a particular foreign body will make your pet sick. The most difficult cases of foreign body ingestion occur whenever the pet owner doesn't know that their pet swallowed something. Also, many foreign bodies that pets swallow are not dense enough to show up on an X-ray. However, the statistics about pets swallowing foreign objects may shock you. About 95 percent of all foreign objects swallowed by pets will pass without causing any problems.
FOOD
JENNIFER JOHNSON | December 19, 2007
For one Lincoln County couple, turtles are a family affair. Not the slow-moving animals with hard shells, but the deliciously decadent candies that go surprisingly fast. For Curtis Hannah and his wife, Meredith Young-Hannah, the making of the turtles has become a holiday tradition they enjoy with Meredith's mom, Martha Frakes. Frakes travels to their Waynesburg home with her husband, Don, all the way from their home in Dunnellon, Fla., to make the turtles on a Friday early in December, and the three enjoy an early family Christmas celebration on Saturday with at least 25 family and friends.
NEWS
By SUSIE LAUN | December 23, 2009
Like my mother's 5-foot, 8-inch frame and brown eyes, her love of holiday sweaters turned out to be hereditary, too. Holiday gear always has been part of my life. My mother's daughter, I've always been fond of holiday socks, underwear and sweatshirts. I wear them shamelessly throughout the year, and my love of socks makes gift-giving a no-brainer for friends. I recently explained my love of holiday sweaters to The Advocate-Messenger's Web Content Producer Emily Toadvine (all the while wearing a hand cross-stitched sweatshirt that said, "Don't get under the mistletoe with anyone else but me" ?
NEWS
By BOBBIE CURD and bcurd@amnews.com | September 24, 2010
LIBERTY — A Kentucky UFO-alien abduction case caught the eye of local playwright Liz Orndorff several years ago, but she tucked her idea for a production based on the claims of three Casey County women into the back of her mind to let it simmer. Although the incident happened more than 30 years ago, Mona Stafford — the only living witness — still hasn’t figured out how to tuck it into the back of hers. “High Strangeness” premiers tonight at West T. Hill Community Theatre in Danville, and a few folks who attended Thursday night’s dress rehearsal said the play is not only funny but quite moving.
NEWS
May 13, 2011
Irene Caudill Bloomfield, wife of Alan F. Bloomfield for 44 years, died peacefully Tuesday, May 10, at her residence with her family at her side.   A native of Winchester, she was born Aug. 15, 1930, a daughter of the late James Herman and Nora Lee Blair Caudill.    She was a graduate of Clark County High School and Fugazzi Business School College.   Irene was a member of Walnut Hill Presbyterian Church, Naples Country Club, Daughters of the American Revolution, a descendent of William Henry Harrison, and a University of Kentucky fellow.    She served in the United States Air Force in the Korean War and was one of the first inductees in the Woman’s War Memorial in Washington, D.C.   Irene was a loving mother and grandmother.
NEWS
February 18, 2012
Danville police and state Alcoholic Beverage Control officials raided the Gator Club early Saturday morning. Danville Police Chief Tony Gray said some members of the private club are suspected of “bootlegging” liquor.  The club, located at 725 South Second St., does not have a license to sell any type of alcoholic beverages, Gray said. Law enforcement seized items “consistent with the findings of the current investigation.” Gray declined to discuss the items seized.
NEWS
By Jonathan Stark and jstark@jessaminejournal.com | April 4, 2012
While most high-school coaches are also teachers and earn the bulk of their pay in the classroom, they are also compensated for their time on and off the field developing their programs. It may just be a few extra bucks on each paycheck, but over the course of a school year, some teachers can increase their annual salaries by several thousand dollars. A teacher making $45,651 - the average salary paid in Jessamine County in the 2011-12 school year - could increase his or her pay 10 percent or more with any of the seven highest-paying head-coaching positions.
NEWS
Don White/The Kentucky Traveler | December 19, 2008
When it comes to ideas for alternative crops, a Kentucky farmer may have the most electrifying of all time. Paul and Darnell Ruley have four acres of brightly lit Christmas decorations on their 250-acre spread in Marion County. What started with "just a handful" of holiday displays 30 years ago has grown into a menagerie containing over a half million lights, according to the couple. The spectacle of light and sound attracts thousands of visitors from as far away as Somerset, Owensboro and Indiana.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
BOYLE DISTRICT COURT Judge Jeff Dotson presiding Jeffery D. Cutter, fourth-degree domestic assault, $100, 90 days, credit for 20 days served, remaining time probated one year. Adam Difrancesco, 27, 647 1/2 Old Shakertown Road, fourth-degree domestic assault, $100, 30 days, consecutively with any other time, credit for two days served, remaining time probated two years James M. Gooch, 19, Kings Mountain, driving under the influence of intoxicants, $200, license suspended 120 days; possession of open alcohol container in vehicle, dismissed.
NEWS
By SHARON WILLIAMS and Contributing Writer | October 15, 2012
Sometimes you want to send someone a unique gift in the mail but you really need to keep the cost of shipping down to a minimum. Maybe you have a grandchild or niece who is having a birthday. You don't want to spend more on shipping than you do on the present. Sure you can send a gift card, but where's the creativity in that?  There are so many options for cool gifts easy to mail! Here are a few of my favorites. Cool gifts that are easy to mail 1. Eco-Orbs: These are sold by many names: Crystal Soil, Water Gels or Eco-Orbies.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
Joshua Aaron Coffman, 28, of Paris, formerly of Danville, died July 4, 2013.   Born Oct. 10, 1984, in Danville, he is a son of David and Rebecca Spanyer of Danville. A 2003 graduate of Danville High School, he was a cook and worked at Alfalfa's restaurant in Lexington. He was a master at video games and built his own computers. Josh was a writer and read voraciously. He was carefree and always had a positive attitude. He was a free spirit and dearly loved his dog, Cindy Lou. In addition to his parents, he is survived by his brother, David C. Spanyer of Danville; and his grandmother, Jane Spanyer of Lexington.
NEWS
TODD KLEFFMAN | April 23, 2006
McAFEE - Since high school, Gordon "Cappy" Wheeler dreamed of being a champion horse trainer in Kentucky, and he fanned the flames of that dream in Mercer County. During his summer vacations, Wheeler would leave his Virginia home to work at the farm of legendary Saddlebred trainer Tom Moore. "He was very envious of what Dad had going and he wanted to get close to Kentucky," said Mason Moore, Tom Moore's son, who has known Wheeler since those days 20 years ago. Of course, if your grandfather is beer titan Adolphus Busch III, horsey dreams are at your fingertips.
Advertisement
Central Kentucky News Articles
|
|
|