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Featured Articles from the Central Kentucky News

News | By Jonathan Kleppinger and jkleppinger@jessaminejournal.com | December 1, 2010
Jerry Allender drives a lot of places. He routinely leaves his Wilmore home to come to Nicholasville; he makes an annual 100-mile trip north; and this year, he drove to the reenactment of the Battle of Perryville. But Allender doesn’t sit behind the wheel of a car; he holds the reins as he sits in the carriage being pulled by his horse. The horse and carriage started as a hobby and turned into a business for Allender, and now he hopes to have others join him next year for a scenic trip back to Perryville.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
A “foreign body” is the term we use to describe anything other than food that your pet may have swallowed. It can be very complicated to determine whether a particular foreign body will make your pet sick. The most difficult cases of foreign body ingestion occur whenever the pet owner doesn't know that their pet swallowed something. Also, many foreign bodies that pets swallow are not dense enough to show up on an X-ray. However, the statistics about pets swallowing foreign objects may shock you. About 95 percent of all foreign objects swallowed by pets will pass without causing any problems.
NEWS
By Keith Taylor and The Winchester Sun | October 1, 2011
LEXINGTON - Every day, Andrew Rogers has to remind himself he's not dreaming when he awakes. “Sometimes I sit back and think, 'Am I really here or really there?'” he said. “It's just so much fun.” The George Rogers Clark graduate serves as a manager for former University of Kentucky standout and Sacramento Kings standout DeMarcus Cousins and making sure his schedule is intact and performing other pertinent duties. Rogers and Cousins have been close for more than two years, and one is hardly spotted in public without the other.
NEWS
JONATHAN SCHWAB | December 28, 2008
While many locals celebrated Christmas on Thursday, several individuals and families also are observing Kwanzaa, a Pan-African holiday reflecting on what it means to be African and human in the fullest sense. J.H. Atkins of Danville and his family observed both holidays. A black professor of education at Centre College, Atkins hosted a Kwanzaa celebration at his house Friday, the first day of the week-long holiday created in 1966 by author and scholar/activist Dr. Maulana Karenga to reaffirm and restore rootedness in African culture for black people.
NEWS
By Jonathan Stark and jstark@jessaminejournal.com | April 4, 2012
While most high-school coaches are also teachers and earn the bulk of their pay in the classroom, they are also compensated for their time on and off the field developing their programs. It may just be a few extra bucks on each paycheck, but over the course of a school year, some teachers can increase their annual salaries by several thousand dollars. A teacher making $45,651 - the average salary paid in Jessamine County in the 2011-12 school year - could increase his or her pay 10 percent or more with any of the seven highest-paying head-coaching positions.
NEWS
February 18, 2012
Danville police and state Alcoholic Beverage Control officials raided the Gator Club early Saturday morning. Danville Police Chief Tony Gray said some members of the private club are suspected of “bootlegging” liquor.  The club, located at 725 South Second St., does not have a license to sell any type of alcoholic beverages, Gray said. Law enforcement seized items “consistent with the findings of the current investigation.” Gray declined to discuss the items seized.
NEWS
BOBBIE CURD | September 5, 2006
LANCASTER - In a maroon Lady Lions Soccer sweatshirt, the logo "Smile, God Loves You" across the back in bold white letters, Don Pineur walks through his trailer, showing off pictures of the past. He stops to narrate the story behind one taken with his wife on a city street in the early 1940s. He prefers to talk in the kitchen, where his fridge is covered with more recent photos of kids, several others in frames, hung on walls or sitting on countertops. He seems more at ease when he can see them.
NEWS
September 30, 2006
FRANKFORT (AP) - Kenny Bishop was living his dream, standing in front of adoring fans in auditoriums across the country, singing gospel songs with his family as part of one of the most popular groups in Christian music. That ended in 2001 when the group disbanded unexpectedly and without explanation. Five years later, Bishop is back on the southern gospel charts with an album that sheds light on his departure. All the songs are about grace, including one based on the biblical story of the prodigal son, a young man who left his family for a life of sinful fun that ended with him having lost everything and living with pigs.
NEWS
By BOBBIE CURD and bcurd@amnews.com | September 24, 2010
LIBERTY — A Kentucky UFO-alien abduction case caught the eye of local playwright Liz Orndorff several years ago, but she tucked her idea for a production based on the claims of three Casey County women into the back of her mind to let it simmer. Although the incident happened more than 30 years ago, Mona Stafford — the only living witness — still hasn’t figured out how to tuck it into the back of hers. “High Strangeness” premiers tonight at West T. Hill Community Theatre in Danville, and a few folks who attended Thursday night’s dress rehearsal said the play is not only funny but quite moving.
SPORTS
LARRY VAUGHT | July 19, 2007
Friday will mark the end of seeing a familiar face on WLEX-TV. Sports anchor Ryan Lemond is leaving the Lexington TV station to pursue a real estate career - and he's going to be missed by central Kentucky viewers that have grown to trust and like that smiling face and knowledgeable personality. Lemond didn't want to be the center of the sportscast. Instead, he wanted to share the day's top stories in a friendly, conversational manner that was easy to understand and enjoy.
NEWS
By TODD KLEFFMAN and tkleffman@amnews.com | August 13, 2011
STANFORD - With a trial date now two weeks away, prosecutors and defense attorneys in the Jason Napier murder case did some last-minute wrangling Friday in front of Lincoln Circuit Judge David Tapp. Assistant Commonwealth's Attorney David Dalton petitioned Tapp to allow five witnesses to testify about how 4-year-old Nathaniel Knox expressed his fear of Napier in the days before he was beaten to death in July of 2009. One of the witnesses would testify that the boy asked him if he had a gun so he could shoot Napier, whom the boy said repeatedly hit him on the head and was mean to him, Dalton said.
OBITUARY
May 20, 2009
Herbert H. "Pete" Royse, Jr., 68, beloved husband of Mary Sue Willis Royse, died Saturday, May 16. He was a teacher, coach and administrator with the Jessamine County schools for 43 years. He was born in Nicholasville, Jan. 29, 1941, to the late Herbert H. Royse and Gertrude Conn Royse. He was a 1958 graduate of Nicholasville High School. He obtained his Bachelor of Arts and Master's Degrees from the University of Kentucky, a member of Theta chapter of Kappa Alpha Order and Phi Delta Kappa education fraternity.
NEWS
By Amelia Orwick and aorwick@jessaminejournal.com | June 12, 2013
When he was just a boy, Jeff Brewer dreamed of opening his own business, and now at age 59, he will have a second chance at success. Brewer opened his first store in Nonesuch in 2003. But after about four years, he and his wife, Barbara, realized that it was not bringing in enough money to make it worth their time. When Barbara died in 2009, Brewer was left with a void to fill. So today he is preparing to open a restaurant, and hoping for a better outcome. The Brewer's cafe will open at 116 S. Main St. in Nicholasville, offering sandwiches and other fare to the downtown population.
NEWS
November 13, 2012
Benjamin Leonard Locke, 24, of Winchester, passed away Sunday, Nov. 11, as the result of an automobile accident.  A native of Marietta, Ohio, he was born Dec. 31, 1987, to mother, Glenda Daniels Locke of Roseville, Ohio, and father, Phillip D. (Charlotte) Locke of Crooksville, Ohio.  He worked as an assembler for Infiltrators System, Inc.    Other survivors include one brother, Robert William Locke; two sisters, April D. (Mark) Lawson and F. Michelle (Peyton) Bowling; stepsister, Heather Pierce and her son, Carter; and nieces and nephews, Landen Locke, Brycen Locke, Hunter Lawson and Ryleigh Lawson.  Funeral services will be Wednesday at 11 a.m. at the Rolan G. Taylor Funeral Home, 289 S. Main St., with Pastor Clay Groves officiating.  Visitation will be tonight from 5 to 7 at the funeral home.  Pallbearers will be Phillip Locke, Robert Locke, Peyton Bowling, Mark Lawson, Curtis King and Jared Gibson.  Burial will be in the Boonesboro Cemetery. 
NEWS
By Kendall Sparks | March 26, 2013
A Shawnee village once located in Clark County remains all but lost to time, but state anthropologists hope landowners in the Indian Old Fields area will join in the hunt. The University of Kentucky's Department of Anthropology and the Kentucky Heritage Council presented a program Monday at the Bluegrass Heritage Museum on the search for Eskippakithiki, a Shawnee village, at the Indian Old Fields in Clark County. The Kentucky Archaeological Survey (KAS), administered by both the anthropology department and the council, is designed to educate the public about Kentucky's history and focuses on preservation.
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