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Featured Articles from the Central Kentucky News

News | By Jonathan Kleppinger and jkleppinger@jessaminejournal.com | December 1, 2010
Jerry Allender drives a lot of places. He routinely leaves his Wilmore home to come to Nicholasville; he makes an annual 100-mile trip north; and this year, he drove to the reenactment of the Battle of Perryville. But Allender doesn’t sit behind the wheel of a car; he holds the reins as he sits in the carriage being pulled by his horse. The horse and carriage started as a hobby and turned into a business for Allender, and now he hopes to have others join him next year for a scenic trip back to Perryville.
NEWS
CHARLIE COX | August 15, 2008
BURGIN - Jacqueline Coleman says her life has been like a movie lately, namely "Swing Vote. " The just-released flick stars Kevin Costner as a small-town man whose one vote decides a presidential election and finds himself in the middle of a media swarm, as he struggles with his decision. Coleman said the character's experience is not unlike hers of late. "It's like nobody cared what I thought before, but now everyone is like 'please come join us at our event' and 'you should think about this.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
A “foreign body” is the term we use to describe anything other than food that your pet may have swallowed. It can be very complicated to determine whether a particular foreign body will make your pet sick. The most difficult cases of foreign body ingestion occur whenever the pet owner doesn't know that their pet swallowed something. Also, many foreign bodies that pets swallow are not dense enough to show up on an X-ray. However, the statistics about pets swallowing foreign objects may shock you. About 95 percent of all foreign objects swallowed by pets will pass without causing any problems.
NEWS
By BEN KLEPPINGER and bkleppinger@amnews.com | August 4, 2010
LANCASTER — Garrard County Attorney Jeff Moss has stepped down from his position in order to begin teaching at Garrard County High School. Moss resigned Friday, and Assistant County Attorney Chris Whitworth was appointed to fill his position until Mark Metcalf takes over in January. Whitworth said Moss resigned when he did because of the timing involved with the start of the school year. Whitworth, who also runs a private practice, said handling the duties of county attorney and the needs of his private clients will be tough, but he thinks he can handle it. “I’ve gotten fairly adept at juggling,” he said.
NEWS
CHARLIE COX | October 5, 2008
A mansion at the dead end of a street that springs upon unsuspecting drivers in the darkness of the night. A nurse at the hospital who checks on patients more than 60 years after her death. And a historic Civil War battlefield where piles of discarded limbs from wounded soldiers surrounded the field. They are just a few of many area locations said to be "haunted" in one form or another. As Halloween draws near, The Advocate-Messenger decided to check out these ghost tales. Read on - if you dare.
NEWS
February 18, 2012
Danville police and state Alcoholic Beverage Control officials raided the Gator Club early Saturday morning. Danville Police Chief Tony Gray said some members of the private club are suspected of “bootlegging” liquor.  The club, located at 725 South Second St., does not have a license to sell any type of alcoholic beverages, Gray said. Law enforcement seized items “consistent with the findings of the current investigation.” Gray declined to discuss the items seized.
NEWS
By BOBBIE CURD and bcurd@amnews.com | September 24, 2010
LIBERTY — A Kentucky UFO-alien abduction case caught the eye of local playwright Liz Orndorff several years ago, but she tucked her idea for a production based on the claims of three Casey County women into the back of her mind to let it simmer. Although the incident happened more than 30 years ago, Mona Stafford — the only living witness — still hasn’t figured out how to tuck it into the back of hers. “High Strangeness” premiers tonight at West T. Hill Community Theatre in Danville, and a few folks who attended Thursday night’s dress rehearsal said the play is not only funny but quite moving.
NEWS
By Jonathan Stark and jstark@jessaminejournal.com | April 4, 2012
While most high-school coaches are also teachers and earn the bulk of their pay in the classroom, they are also compensated for their time on and off the field developing their programs. It may just be a few extra bucks on each paycheck, but over the course of a school year, some teachers can increase their annual salaries by several thousand dollars. A teacher making $45,651 - the average salary paid in Jessamine County in the 2011-12 school year - could increase his or her pay 10 percent or more with any of the seven highest-paying head-coaching positions.
NEWS
October 20, 2011
HARRODSBURG - Stanley Helm, 95, of Danville, died Sunday, Oct. 16, 2011, at Charleston Health Care Center in Danville. Born Oct. 26, 1915, in Parksville, he was the son of the late Benjamin Hardin Helm and Mary Moore Helm. Stanley was a former Union Pacific Railroad employee and a veteran of World War II. He was a member of Parksville Christian Church and enjoyed horse racing. Stanley is survived by four nephews, Wayne Westerfield of Harrodsburg, John Cocanougher of Oxford, Ohio, H.P. Durham of Prescott, Ariz., and Donald Helm of Fish Creek, Wis.; two nieces, Lillian Scoyen of Palo Alto, Calif., and Mary Jo Helm of Fish Creek, Wis.; and several great nieces and nephews.
NEWS
By LARRY VAUGHT and larry@amnews.com | August 24, 2010
LEXINGTON — He played for a Tennessee high school powerhouse — Alcoa — and grew up within minutes of the University of Tennessee campus. Yet Randall Cobb says it was his parents, not a coach or player, who had the biggest influence on what has already been a highly successful football career. “It was probably my dad who had the biggest influence,” said Cobb, UK’s versatile junior who is a preseason all-Southeastern Conference selection. “He has always been there supporting me, but he has also pushed me to be better than what I was. “I wouldn’t be nowhere near where I am at now if it was not for him and the things he did for me and the sacrifices he made to get my family where we are today.
NEWS
Abigail Laub | June 1, 2006
East's Brittany Turner said she would love to play soccer in college. With the help of Alex Shearer, the school's new girls soccer coach who has sent 20 or more soccer players to college, the sophomore is excited to have her dream realized. "He seems like he's got goals for us," said Turner. Shearer, a math teacher, was recently hired by East, and along with coaching varsity soccer, he will take over the middle school program. A Transylvania University athlete and alum, Shearer previously coached at Hopkinsville, Walt Disney World and most recently, Graves County.
NEWS
HERB BROCK | September 12, 2008
John Higgins' resume doesn't read like that of a typical pastor. In fact, it's more of a rap sheet than a resume. Instead of being a student at this Bible college or that theological seminary, Higgins served much of his younger years as a prisoner, including several years at Northpoint Training Center near Danville. "I do not have the background of most pastors," Higgins said with a laugh. But a pastor he is. Just a few months ago he was called as worship pastor at Cornerstone Assembly of God in Danville.
NEWS
By JERRY LITTLE | October 18, 2011
Selecting the right varieties for the location and transplanting them in the fall gives trees and shrubs a head start on winter, and helps them provide pleasure and beauty for years to come. Now through November is the best time to transplant trees and shrubs. Ornamentals lose less moisture because fall days are shorter, outdoor temperatures are cooler and rainfall usually is adequate. These conditions also help retain soil moisture so plants can settle into their new location. Also, many of these plants are deciduous and lose their leaves in the fall so their demand for water is less.
NEWS
By TODD KLEFFMAN and tkleffman@amnews.com | March 23, 2013
SOUTH FORK - Paul Martin is a small, wiry man with a higher-pitched voice, sharp features and kind nature that lends him an air of a wizened old elf. Beneath a broad-brimmed black hat, he is dressed in all black, sharp as tack, even though he has just pedaled three miles on his bicycle from Cedar Hill Mennonite Church, where some visiting Mennonite brethren from Iowa had just held forth. Martin is back at Dutchman's Market now. It's the store he and his late wife Ruth opened in 1982, one the first businesses to set up shop in the start-up Mennonite community in southern Casey County.
NEWS
EMILY BURTON | March 4, 2004
CRAB ORCHARD - This winter, as gardeners sipped hot chocolate and entertained green dreams of growing things, members of the Amish community cultivated a new produce auction pavilion for the fruits, and vegetables, of their labors. The Lincoln County Produce Auction is almost ripe for it's April 13 opening day. With Tuesday's delivery of rich black asphalt for the parking lot, the new pavilion is ready to flourish. "We hope to provide an additional income and market for Lincoln County farmers," said the general manager of the auction.
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