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Featured Articles from the Central Kentucky News

News | By Jonathan Kleppinger and jkleppinger@jessaminejournal.com | December 1, 2010
Jerry Allender drives a lot of places. He routinely leaves his Wilmore home to come to Nicholasville; he makes an annual 100-mile trip north; and this year, he drove to the reenactment of the Battle of Perryville. But Allender doesn’t sit behind the wheel of a car; he holds the reins as he sits in the carriage being pulled by his horse. The horse and carriage started as a hobby and turned into a business for Allender, and now he hopes to have others join him next year for a scenic trip back to Perryville.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
A “foreign body” is the term we use to describe anything other than food that your pet may have swallowed. It can be very complicated to determine whether a particular foreign body will make your pet sick. The most difficult cases of foreign body ingestion occur whenever the pet owner doesn't know that their pet swallowed something. Also, many foreign bodies that pets swallow are not dense enough to show up on an X-ray. However, the statistics about pets swallowing foreign objects may shock you. About 95 percent of all foreign objects swallowed by pets will pass without causing any problems.
NEWS
KEVIN DUKE | April 25, 2007
When Warfield Clay died in 2005, he left his farm to his youngest son, Stone Clay, who hasturned the area into a self-sustainable farm and center of agro-tourism. Woodwind Farm, located in Junction City, sits atop a hill pushed back from the hustle and bustle of any sort of metropolis. The name was derived, according to Clay, from the fact that the farm has been left forested and the wind whips through the trees, especially those at the top of the hill. Clay's house sits at the peak but at the base of the hill lies an old tobacco barn, since renovated by Clay and turned into an ideal spot for a concert, corporate or church gathering, outdoor wedding reception, or family reunion.
NEWS
By BOBBIE CURD and bcurd@amnews.com | September 24, 2010
LIBERTY — A Kentucky UFO-alien abduction case caught the eye of local playwright Liz Orndorff several years ago, but she tucked her idea for a production based on the claims of three Casey County women into the back of her mind to let it simmer. Although the incident happened more than 30 years ago, Mona Stafford — the only living witness — still hasn’t figured out how to tuck it into the back of hers. “High Strangeness” premiers tonight at West T. Hill Community Theatre in Danville, and a few folks who attended Thursday night’s dress rehearsal said the play is not only funny but quite moving.
NEWS
BOBBIE CURD | July 15, 2005
DOGWALK - Bobby Wynn and his twin boys hoped to catch some bluegill when they went fishing Sunday morning at a Lincoln County pond. They never imagined they would end up with a 22-pound alligator. Wynn, who lives in Rockcastle County, and his 10-year-olds David and Derek were fishing at the farm of Wynn's sister and brother-in-law in Dogwalk, a community in Lincoln County. Wynn said he cast his line into a cove, and on the third toss he saw the alligator roll over and hit the bait.
NEWS
By Jonathan Stark and jstark@jessaminejournal.com | April 4, 2012
While most high-school coaches are also teachers and earn the bulk of their pay in the classroom, they are also compensated for their time on and off the field developing their programs. It may just be a few extra bucks on each paycheck, but over the course of a school year, some teachers can increase their annual salaries by several thousand dollars. A teacher making $45,651 - the average salary paid in Jessamine County in the 2011-12 school year - could increase his or her pay 10 percent or more with any of the seven highest-paying head-coaching positions.
NEWS
November 9, 2011
The Kentucky Banker's Association calls it a “scheme” but unless - and until - legislators change the law, so called “third-party tax purchasers” will continue to profit from a policy that can lead to a forced sale of a family home. As the law stands, individuals, or companies formed for just this purpose, can purchase overdue property tax debt as an investment. The tax debt plus up to 12 percent interest as well as additional administrative and attorney fees increase the original debt substantially.
NEWS
By TODD¿KLEFFMAN and tkleffman@amnews.com | November 5, 2011
In the middle of the night a little more than a year ago, Michael P. Durham woke up in his Moreland home, popped a couple of night-time pain relievers and tried to go back to sleep. A short time later, however, Durham “began experiencing abdominal pain, brownouts, blackouts and a general sense of lightheadedness.” Then he developed an ulcer that “produced pain and caused an enormous amount of blood loss”¿that eventually required transfusions to keep him alive. It wasn't the Equate brand Rapid Release PM¿Pills that made Durham sick; it was the cannister inserted in the bottle meant to keep the pills dry that Durham inadvertently swallowed along with the tablets in his mid-night state of mind.
NEWS
February 18, 2012
Danville police and state Alcoholic Beverage Control officials raided the Gator Club early Saturday morning. Danville Police Chief Tony Gray said some members of the private club are suspected of “bootlegging” liquor.  The club, located at 725 South Second St., does not have a license to sell any type of alcoholic beverages, Gray said. Law enforcement seized items “consistent with the findings of the current investigation.” Gray declined to discuss the items seized.
NEWS
By Keith Taylor and The Winchester Sun | October 1, 2011
LEXINGTON - Every day, Andrew Rogers has to remind himself he's not dreaming when he awakes. “Sometimes I sit back and think, 'Am I really here or really there?'” he said. “It's just so much fun.” The George Rogers Clark graduate serves as a manager for former University of Kentucky standout and Sacramento Kings standout DeMarcus Cousins and making sure his schedule is intact and performing other pertinent duties. Rogers and Cousins have been close for more than two years, and one is hardly spotted in public without the other.
NEWS
By LARRY VAUGHT and larry@amnews.com | November 26, 2010
Longtime Kentucky basketball fans Beth and Jason Boyle of Stanford were among the Kentucky fans in Hawaii this week for the Maui Invitational. Before the Wildcats lost to Connecticut in the championship game, Jason Boyle took time to share a few thoughts about how their trip: Question: What made you and Beth decide to make the trip to Maui and when did you start planning this trip? Boyle: “We were leaving a Cincinnati Reds game one night, and I’m not sure how the conversation started, but within a week or so, Beth and I, along with my parents, had decided we were going to make it happen.
NEWS
September 30, 2006
FRANKFORT (AP) - Kenny Bishop was living his dream, standing in front of adoring fans in auditoriums across the country, singing gospel songs with his family as part of one of the most popular groups in Christian music. That ended in 2001 when the group disbanded unexpectedly and without explanation. Five years later, Bishop is back on the southern gospel charts with an album that sheds light on his departure. All the songs are about grace, including one based on the biblical story of the prodigal son, a young man who left his family for a life of sinful fun that ended with him having lost everything and living with pigs.
NEWS
December 16, 2006
WINCHESTER POLICE Crimes Reported On Friday at 3:16 p.m., Winchester Police received a call concerning the fraudulent use of a food stamps card. The victim, Jennifer Cornwell of 11 Hughes Ave., Apt. 4, told police a suspect stole her card and used it at South Main Grocery on two occasions, charging a total of $41.53. The store owner also said she remembered the person using a food stamps card. Melissa C. Hoskins, 39, of 292 -B Vaught Road reported to Winchester Police at 2:15 p.m. Friday that a known male had threatened her with bodily harm.
NEWS
By DAVID BROCK and dbrock@amnews.com | April 29, 2012
One of Danville's newer businesses has raised eyebrows with some of its risqué offerings, but the owners say they are providing a legal and less seedy alternative to similar stores elsewhere. Behind Closed Doors, which opened at 800 Finn Hill Drive in January, sells a number of adult novelties, lingerie and items some would describe as sex toys, along with band posters, T-shirts and other items. A large part of the store's inventory also includes a variety of pipes for smoking tobacco.
FEATURES
LIZ MAPLES | July 23, 2006
GRAVEL SWITCH - If toilets on wheels racing toward a country store is not the oddest oddity in Casey County, try Ernie Brown Jr. He makes Crocodile Dundee look timid. Brown, who is known as Turtleman, will be the grand marshal of the Outhouse Blowout at Penn's Country Store Sept. 9, and he plans to bring along his turtle shells and turtle tales. From his neck to his toes, he is dressed in camouflage, and he tops it off with a leather cowboy hat trimmed with a band of turtle tail leather and snapping turtle claws.
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