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Featured Articles from the Central Kentucky News

News | By Jonathan Kleppinger and jkleppinger@jessaminejournal.com | December 1, 2010
Jerry Allender drives a lot of places. He routinely leaves his Wilmore home to come to Nicholasville; he makes an annual 100-mile trip north; and this year, he drove to the reenactment of the Battle of Perryville. But Allender doesn’t sit behind the wheel of a car; he holds the reins as he sits in the carriage being pulled by his horse. The horse and carriage started as a hobby and turned into a business for Allender, and now he hopes to have others join him next year for a scenic trip back to Perryville.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
A “foreign body” is the term we use to describe anything other than food that your pet may have swallowed. It can be very complicated to determine whether a particular foreign body will make your pet sick. The most difficult cases of foreign body ingestion occur whenever the pet owner doesn't know that their pet swallowed something. Also, many foreign bodies that pets swallow are not dense enough to show up on an X-ray. However, the statistics about pets swallowing foreign objects may shock you. About 95 percent of all foreign objects swallowed by pets will pass without causing any problems.
NEWS
By MANDY SIMPSON | February 5, 2011
LANCASTER - Say the name “Josh” and many Garrard County residents will know who you mean. No last name, job title or physical description necessary. A lot of people can even tell you Josh’s daily routine around the Lancaster Public Square — visit the banks, check out the library, chow down at Smith’s Restaurant (especially on pan-fried steak Tuesday), and finish the day at the courthouse. “Everybody knows Josh,” City Councilman Brandon McGlone said.
FOOD
JENNIFER JOHNSON | December 19, 2007
For one Lincoln County couple, turtles are a family affair. Not the slow-moving animals with hard shells, but the deliciously decadent candies that go surprisingly fast. For Curtis Hannah and his wife, Meredith Young-Hannah, the making of the turtles has become a holiday tradition they enjoy with Meredith's mom, Martha Frakes. Frakes travels to their Waynesburg home with her husband, Don, all the way from their home in Dunnellon, Fla., to make the turtles on a Friday early in December, and the three enjoy an early family Christmas celebration on Saturday with at least 25 family and friends.
NEWS
By Mike Moore and mmoore@jessaminejournal.com | April 22, 2013
Citing low revenue streams and a need to beef up public-safety services, the Nicholasville City Commission passed an ordinance Monday that would allow Sunday alcohol sales starting July 1. Nicholasville finance director Laurie Young and utilities director Tom Calkins told the city commission that a 5-percent regulatory license fee on the sale of alcoholic beverages allowing Sunday alcohol sales would add $600,000 to $800,000 annually for the city's...
NEWS
By Rachel Gilliam | December 21, 2012
For the Martin family, life really is a circus. Four kids, professional music careers and a family group with a growing number of performances can be a bit chaotic. Parents Paul and Jamie had that chaos in mind when they named their fledgling band The Martin Family Circus in 2010. “Jamie had decided to come, she was working a corporate job, and I was on the road with Marty Stuart. Our lives were nuts,” Paul Martin said. Winchester native Paul Martin has been performing with country musician Marty Stuart for years, and plays bass for “The Marty Stuart Show.” Previously, he has performed with the Oak Ridge Boys and Exile.
NEWS
November 9, 2011
The Kentucky Banker's Association calls it a “scheme” but unless - and until - legislators change the law, so called “third-party tax purchasers” will continue to profit from a policy that can lead to a forced sale of a family home. As the law stands, individuals, or companies formed for just this purpose, can purchase overdue property tax debt as an investment. The tax debt plus up to 12 percent interest as well as additional administrative and attorney fees increase the original debt substantially.
OBITUARY
April 1, 2008
DEATHS Georgia Ann Carey, 84, of Junction City died Monday. Arrangements are pending at Preston-Pruitt Funeral Home. Mary L. Humphrey, 82, of Stanford died Sunday in Winchester. Arrangements are pending at Spurlin Funeral Home, Stanford. FUNERALS Dorothy H. Neale1921-2008 Dorothy Hundley Neale, 86, of Danville, widow of Lewis Newland Neale Jr., died Sunday. Born Aug. 21, 1921, in Lebanon, she was a daughter of the late James Phillips and Sarah Bottom Hundley.
NEWS
Don White/The Kentucky Traveler | December 19, 2008
When it comes to ideas for alternative crops, a Kentucky farmer may have the most electrifying of all time. Paul and Darnell Ruley have four acres of brightly lit Christmas decorations on their 250-acre spread in Marion County. What started with "just a handful" of holiday displays 30 years ago has grown into a menagerie containing over a half million lights, according to the couple. The spectacle of light and sound attracts thousands of visitors from as far away as Somerset, Owensboro and Indiana.
NEWS
September 30, 2006
FRANKFORT (AP) - Kenny Bishop was living his dream, standing in front of adoring fans in auditoriums across the country, singing gospel songs with his family as part of one of the most popular groups in Christian music. That ended in 2001 when the group disbanded unexpectedly and without explanation. Five years later, Bishop is back on the southern gospel charts with an album that sheds light on his departure. All the songs are about grace, including one based on the biblical story of the prodigal son, a young man who left his family for a life of sinful fun that ended with him having lost everything and living with pigs.
NEWS
By BOBBIE CURD and bcurd@amnews.com | July 20, 2010
Mike Thompson and his family don’t draw attention to themselves because of their famous relative, but they are not ashamed, either. “To my mom, he wasn’t ‘public enemy No. 1,’” Thompson said. His mother, Frances Thompson, 88, is the youngest sister to John Dillinger, the legendary bank robber still profiled in books and movies more than 80 years after his death. Thompson and his fiancé, Patty Kale, came to Danville on Saturday with his son, Travis, and his wife Megan, to see the Pioneer Playhouse production of “The Dillinger Dilemma,” written by local playwright and Danville native Elizabeth Orndorff.
NEWS
By MILTON SCARBOROUGH and Contributing Writer | October 29, 2012
Editor's note: This is the seventh of an 11-part series on Buddhism.   Philosophical Hinduism was based on the Upanishads, divinely revealed philosophical writings (shruti), which only men of the upper three classes were permitted to read. Later writings, however, based on human wisdom (smriti), became available to all persons. Most important among them was the Bhagavad-Gita, which held that the highest religion was based on bhakti yoga (faith in and devotion to a personal God)
NEWS
By Dr. Jeff Castle, DVM | August 28, 2010
An Elizabethan collar is known by many different names such as surgical collar, buster collar and an abbreviation called E-collar. There has never been a veterinary medical device to receive as much attention as the E-collar. It is the subject for countless jokes and comic strips. It really is an unnatural, cumbersome, funny looking contraption around the neck of a cat or dog. The E-collar is a cone-shaped hard plastic device placed around a patient’s neck to prevent the dog or cat from licking or chewing on their wound or surgical incision.
NEWS
By TODD KLEFFMAN and tkleffman@amnews.com | March 23, 2013
SOUTH FORK - Paul Martin is a small, wiry man with a higher-pitched voice, sharp features and kind nature that lends him an air of a wizened old elf. Beneath a broad-brimmed black hat, he is dressed in all black, sharp as tack, even though he has just pedaled three miles on his bicycle from Cedar Hill Mennonite Church, where some visiting Mennonite brethren from Iowa had just held forth. Martin is back at Dutchman's Market now. It's the store he and his late wife Ruth opened in 1982, one the first businesses to set up shop in the start-up Mennonite community in southern Casey County.
OPINION
U.S. SENATOR MITCH McCONNELL | June 29, 2006
Whether flying on an aircraft carrier, hanging in one of our embassies or worn as a patch on a soldier's uniform, the American flag stands for freedom. The vast majority of Americans honor the flag, and rightly so. Some would go so far as to amend the Constitution to protect the flag against those who would burn it. While I share and admire their patriotism, altering our First Amendment, even for the worthy purpose of protecting the flag, is not a position I can support. Make no mistake - I treasure the Stars and Stripes as much as any American.
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