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Drought

OPINION
October 23, 2007
Dear Editor, To rain or not to rain, that's the question? Some parts of Kentucky are in a severe to extreme drought. Appalachia, Va., has a 30-day supply of drinking water. Atlanta, Ga., has a 90-day supply of water for 5 million people. We can go to the grocery store and see the shelves stocked with a bountiful supply of vegetables and food stuff. We are becoming complacent and taking it for granted that this will always be the case. There is a God in the third heaven who put the thousands of stars and planets in a perfect synchronized order.
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NEWS
STEPHANIE SCHELL | October 11, 2007
STANFORD - Bill Payne recently laid 1,000 feet of waterline, but he's not building a home. He's hydrating his livestock. "This is as close as we've got to a real hard spot," said Payne, a Lincoln County farmer who's boasted the profession since 1974. His dairy farm operation, Knob Lick Farms LLC on Ky. 300, now is partially operating on Hustonville city water, thanks to the drought. The south end of the farm has two natural springs that used to help keep Payne's livestock satisfied.
NEWS
October 10, 2007
FARM SERVICE AGENCY A lack of moisture, over an extended period of time, has caused producers in Boyle County to suffer from the effect of severe drought conditions. Farms experiencing severe drought conditions may be eligible for cost-share assistance under Emergency Conservation Program. This disaster program is administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Farm Service Agency, which provides cost-share assistance if the damage is so severe that water available for livestock or orchards and vineyards has been reduced below normal to the extent that neither can survive without additional water.
NEWS
October 4, 2007
A lack of moisture over an extended period of time has caused producers in Clark County to suffer from severe drought conditions. But, farms experiencing severe drought conditions may be eligible for cost-share assistance under the Emergency Conservation Program. This disaster program is administered by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Farm Service Agency, which provides cost-share assistance if the damage is so severe that water available for livestock or orchards and vineyards has been reduced below normal to the extent that neither can survive without additional water.
SPORTS
Nancy Leedy | September 27, 2007
The Lincoln County High School volleyball team has collected its share of wins on the court this season, but the victories the Lady Patriots wanted most ? the district wins ? always managed to elude them. Until Tuesday. The Lincoln faithful cheered as the Lady Pat seniors were honored during the pre-game and, by the end of the match, the cheers had turned to a roar as Lincoln knocked off District 43 rival Casey County 2-1. "They really wanted this win tonight," said Lady Pat Coach Amanda Massey.
FEATURES
JERRY LITTLE | September 26, 2007
The unusual weather conditions of 2007 are creating management problems for Kentucky beef producers. The late spring freeze severely damaged the first cutting of hay, reducing yields by as much as 50 percent. The hot, dry weather that has occurred since has limited pasture growth and has many producers very short of hay and out of pasture. Producers are wondering how they are going to cope with both issues at the same time. While good management decisions can not make it rain, they can help producers hang on in the most economical manner possible.
NEWS
DAN GRIGSON | August 30, 2007
The effect of the extended drought on pastureland may be a little variable. The real question during and toward the end of a drought is whether the plants are still alive, or did they expend too much energy, or were too stressed during the drought and are now dead. Kentucky farmers use a large variety of grasses and legumes in their pastures and the drought and grazing pressure will probably hit each one differently. Alfalfa will go into a dormant state and will generally not be hurt very much by hot, dry weather.
NEWS
BRENDA S. EDWARDS | August 26, 2007
MINTONVILLE - Barbara Hettnansperger enjoys an early morning walk in the woods to observe nature. It helps get her day off to a good start, she says. This summer, though, the Casey County woman sees a big difference in the woods. Many trees already have turned brown and are loosing their leaves. "Even the weeds look stressed," she says. Hackberry and walnut trees usually start to lose their leaves in mid September, but this year their leaves are almost gone now. "The oak trees look fine, but leaves on some of the other trees have begun to turn brown and shrivel up," said Hettnansperger.
NEWS
August 17, 2007
Boyle County Judge-Executive Tony Wilder issued an order Thursday prohibiting all outside burning in the county. "Due to the extreme drought and accompanying high temperatures, there exists very serious fire hazard conditions," Wilder said in issuing the burn ban. The ban will remain in place until conditions improve.
NEWS
DAN GRIGSON | August 16, 2007
Pastures have been suffering for some time, and in many places are as brown as the desert. To me, the lack of midsummer rain only points out more clearly that we are possibly too reliant on cool season grasses for our pasture program. Even though it has been so dry, alfalfa has done pretty good. We need to get more alfalfa-grass into our grazing programs. The warm season grasses can also help us. However, when it does not rain, even warm season grasses won't grow. Look around and you will see that alfalfa has handled this dry weather pretty well.
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