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Drug Court

NEWS
Samieh Shalash | September 20, 2006
Help is on the way for drug-addicted teens who may find themselves in and out of the court system for committing crimes to feed their habits.Juvenile Drug Court, an alternative to detention centers, boot camps and group homes, has arrived in Winchester. The program is a treatment-oriented process that imposes accountability on teens involved in substance abuse. It was brought to Clark County by Judge Brandy Brown, who wrote a grant in 2004 to administer the program both here and in Madison County.
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NEWS
BRENDA S. EDWARDS | July 20, 2006
LIBERTY - A 26-year-old mother of three is the first graduate of Casey County Drug Court. Stephanie Bryant, who became addicted to prescription drugs at the age of 13, said she is on the road to recovery after being a part of Drug Court since September 2004. "This means a lot to me," she said after receiving a plaque and T-shirt Tuesday night from Circuit Judge James G. Weddle. "It gave me an opportunity to change my life. I chose to work the program and worked hard. " Bryant said her whole life has changed and thanked her family and friends who gathered in the Circuit Courtroom for the ceremony.
OPINION
July 12, 2006
Dear Editor, I am responding to the news story about Boyle County Circuit Court Judge Peckler's drug court which ran in the July 10 edition of The Advocate-Messenger. The first few U.S. drug courts began in Miami, Seattle and Anchorage in the 1990s. Now there are hundreds of drug courts nationwide; they vary greatly in form and success. I believe that Judge Peckler is sincere and may have found a new form of drug court that is successful and frugal. Judge Peckler says he does not keep numbers on the success rate of the program.
NEWS
BRENDA S. EDWARDS | July 10, 2006
A program for people who seek help to recover from drug and alcohol addiction is available in Boyle County. The substance abuse program is a form of probation, said Boyle Circuit Judge Darren Peckler. In laymen's terms it is a drug court, but not affiliated with the Kentucky Drug Court operated by the state Administrative Office of the Courts. An article during the three-day series in June about addiction to prescription drugs stated that Casey County had the only drug court for adults in this area which did not sit to well for Peckler, who thinks his program works as well or better than the state drug court.
OPINION
June 28, 2006
Our series this week titled "Prescription for Trouble" examined the abuse of prescription drugs, a problem that is now bigger than the methamphetamine plague that our communities feared for so long. The final stories on Tuesday dealt with the success of Drug Court in helping the addicts who were willing to choose treatment over incarceration. Kentucky's model program is working, according not only to those who operate it, but even to some addicts who claim to have turned their lives around because of it. But Drug Court - like the pills which necessitate its existence - is only the treatment of a symptom, not the cure or prevention of a disease.
NEWS
BRENDA S. EDWARDS | June 27, 2006
LIBERTY - Kentucky Drug Court, which celebrated its 10th anniversary in May, has worked so well, it is a national model for other states. "Our program tries to stop the cycle (of drug abuse) and change lives," said Connie Payne, general manager of the Drug Court Department of the Administrative Office of the Courts in Frankfort. "Addicts learn they can't associate with folks in their past. If they don't change their friends and way of life, it won't work. If they are forced to have new associates, friends and a new life, it will work.
NEWS
TODD KLEFFMAN | June 27, 2006
Editor's Note: Today's stories about prescription drug abuse are the last in a three-day series that examines the growing problems created by the rise of the pill culture. LIBERTY - Outside the Casey County Judicial Center last week, a reporter with a notepad and camera caught the attention of Sam Luttrell. "Are you a journalist?" asked Luttrell, a lively 20-year-old from Russell Springs. "You need to talk to me. " Soon, five others had joined the conversation. Like Luttrell, they were all at the Judicial Center to submit to urine tests as required by their participation in Drug Court, a treatment and rehab focused program they chose over being sentenced to prison for drug convictions.
NEWS
EMILY BURTON | October 31, 2003
SOMERSET - Voters in Lincoln, Pulaski and Rockcastle counties will have a choice Tuesday of three candidates for circuit judge. The seat in the 28th Judicial Circuit came up for grabs when longtime judge Daniel J. Venters stepped down in July. Judge Bob Gillum of Somerset was chosen by Gov. Paul Patton to fill the vacancy and is now running for election to the seat along with lawyers Mark Stanziano and Mike Duncan, also of Somerset. "They're both fine fellows," said Gillum.
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