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Ice Storm

NEWS
Fred Petke | June 4, 2009
Three hundred forty-two high school seniors began their lives as adults this morning, after receiving their diplomas and celebrating into the night. Hours after attending their final classes, they filed onto the football field, robed in red and white for their final official act as high school students at George Rogers Clark High School Tuesday evening. " We will always remember this day â?¦ our last day together and our last memory together," class co-vice president Hannah Edwards said.
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NEWS
June 4, 2009
For many Kentucky landowners, particularly those in Western Kentucky, January's storms left behind a tangled mess of downed branches, broken trunks and splintered limbs in thousands of trees unable to withstand the weight of the ice. Now that the winter of 2009 is over, these landowners face the task of assessing the injury sustained by their woodlands. "There are things that will need to be done over the next several years, a kind of continuing assessment of the damage that trees have suffered," says Jeff Stringer, an Extension Service professor in the University of Kentucky's Department of Forestry.
OPINION
June 1, 2009
Dear Editor, Will someone please tell me who the commission represents? Wednesday's paper was about the decision to sell alcohol on Sunday. This is without restrictions for hours. Even big cities that I have lived in show respect for those who go to church. As the paper stated, there were many who objected and only one person spoke in favor. Does that not carry any weight? We had the issue sometime ago about karaoke and dancing, a harmless pastime for adults and now look where we are. Make sense?
NEWS
DAVID BROCK | June 1, 2009
This year's ice storm provided an abundance of examples for a group of emergency responders and public health workers gathered for a FEMA National Incident Management Systems training course Friday morning in the InterCounty Energy community room. Danville Assistant Fire Chief Woody Ball, who is certified by FEMA, taught the Incident Command System (ICS) 300 course to around 20 people that included fire and emergency personnel from Lincoln and Garrard counties, as well as public health officials and certified volunteers.
OPINION
May 28, 2009
In a purely obstructive move this Tuesday, magistrates refused to commit to fund the County Emergency Manager (EM) position, and it cost the County Judge Gilbert's top choice for the job. Lynn Wisehart, the health department's preparedness planner, opted not to accept Gilbert's appointment saying that she would not work for a group incapable of making such a simple decision. The EM position has been empty for three and-a-half months, and in that time the county has had one tornado and a near miss, and the world has teetered to the edge of a flu pandemic, but that doesn't concern Magistrates Padgett, Adams and Faulkner who are pleased to simply obstruct Gilbert.
NEWS
TODD KLEFFMAN | May 21, 2009
STANFORD - About 50 emergency responders gathered near an empty parking lot, smoking cigarettes and sipping coffee on a sunny morning. They knew something was coming. In a few minutes, a school bus loaded with Lincoln County students would crash head-on into a Lincoln County Readymix truck loaded with tons of cement. There would be lots of serious injuries. Some people would die. But none of the preliminary suspense stopped the waiting responders from having a good time before all hell broke loose.
OPINION
May 20, 2009
Dear Editor, I just wanted to write this to let everyone know that I really appreciated the wonderful efforts that our radio stations did during the ice storm that hit our fair cities in January. They stayed around the clock to be sure that all of us were aware of any information that we needed or any help that we needed. I know that there were thousands of people in the dark and without the media - the radio stations especially - things could have gotten a lot worse. It is so good to know that there are people out there who really care about their hometown people and friends.
NEWS
May 19, 2009
PAINT LICK - A home in Southern Garrard County was destroyed in a fire on Sunday afternoon. Tanya Fain and her two sons had been out of their home since January, when the ice storm damaged it. On Sunday morning, Fain's house on Willow Lane, just off of White Lick Road between Paint Lick and Cartersville, caught fire. Cartersville Fire Chief David Day said by the time the fire department got there, the house already was halfway consumed.The fire caused two small propane tanks at the house to explode, adding fuel and contributing to the rapid spread of the fire, Day said.
NEWS
May 18, 2009
A fire destroyed a house in southern Garrard County, Garrard Central Dispatch confirmed. News reports from WKYT and WLEX said a house along White Lick Road, between Cartersville and Paint Lick, caught fire just before noon on Sunday. No one was hurt. The family living in the house was at a neighbor's home when they heard an explosion, according to WKYT. The house had been damaged in the January ice storm and was undergoing renovations, according to the news reports. Buckeye Fire Department Safety Officer Michael Mullins confirmed the Buckeye, Cartersville Paint Lick, Berea and Garrard County District One fire departments all responded to the fire.
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